America won the women’s World Cup 2019

The 2-0 victory over Holland in the final on July 7 brought American girls the fourth win in the world championship. The US team took the throne when winning all seven matches at the Women’s World Cup 2019.

With the US captain Megan Rapinoe returning to the main kick, both teams have the strongest force for the important match. The American girls joined better when actively taking over the game and giving pressure to the opponent. The opportunity was continuously created by Alex Morgan. The striker twice invaded the penalty area and finished, but the Dutch player Veenendaal played brilliantly.

As the defending champion, American girls are the ones who take the initiative and push the opponent. Many opportunities were created, but the Dutch defense still stood firm. European representatives advocated strong defensive play and waited for the opportunity to launch counter-attacks. But it was not until the end of the first half that the Netherlands created some situations on the ball. However, no table was scored in the first half.

After the break, the United States attacked, paid off with a penalty in the 61st minute. The referee consulted VAR, and determined Van Der Gragt’s defender had a high-legged error, causing Morgan to fall in the penalty area. Captain Rapinoe scored the correct spot on the 11m mark.

By 69 minutes, America doubled the gap. Lavelle takes the ball in the middle and then hits a long-range cannon, kicking the Dutch goalkeeper. The Dutch girls tried to rise up and seek to settle but still failed. The match ended with a score of 2-0. This is the fourth time in US history to win the Women’s World Cup, after the 1991, 1999, and 2015 periods.

Besides the championship, the US team also acquired two other noble individual titles at the Women’s World Cup 2019. Their captain Rapinoe was elected the best player in the tournament. Rapinoe and his teammate Morgan and the striker Ellen White share the best scorer with six goals each.

World Cup2019: France vs America in hopes of making history

The two French and American women’s soccer teams met on the evening of June 28, 2019, at the Parc des Princes, Paris, to win a ticket to the semifinals of the Women’s World Cup 2019. Regarding the correlation of forces, It is impossible for the French to defeat the American team of Megan Rapinoe and Alex Morgan, even though the French team in January inflicted the one and only defeat on American in their last 20 matches.

The overall performance table of the French and American teams clearly shows the difference between the two sides. France has never entered a grand prize, whether it is the World Cup, the World Championship, or the European Cup. Meanwhile, the US team has won the World Cup three times in 1991, 1999 and 2015, and is looking for a fourth Cup. As the top ranking country of FIFA International Football Federation, the United States has also won the Olympics four times, in 1996, 2004, 2008, 2012.

However, in this 2019 World Cup, the talent of the two teams seems to be equal. The US team, despite having spectacularly won the Thai team 13-0, was struggling more in the eighth round, had to kick a penalty to win the Spanish team 2-1.

The French team had a perfect start to the match against the Korean team, winning 3-0, but then in the eighth round, they had to struggle to eliminate the Brazilian team 2-1 with the final goal by Amandine Henry’s in extra time.

France hopes in the match against the USA, home advantage and the enthusiastic cheers of the audience will motivate their female players.

The winner of the match will enter the semifinals to meet the English team, having won the Norwegian team 3-0 on the evening of June 27, 2019, on the ground of the port city of Le Havre, western France.

Germany, who also won Nigeria 3-0, will face the UK on the semi-finals.

U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Sues U.S Federation for Gender Discrimination

United States squad  – The leading women’s soccer team significantly recorded a gender discrimination lawsuit against their home soccer federation over pay equity and discriminated working conditions

On Friday, more than two dozen of United States women’s national team members brought U.S. Soccer to a federal court.

The suit is hold by United States District Court in Los Angeles, just comes three months before the female team will compete for its Women’s World Cup title at this summer’s tournament in France. In their case and a statement released by the team, twenty-eight players described that US soccer give “institutionalized gender discrimination” that has existed for years.

The discrimination, the female players said, affects not only their wages but also the location and the consequences, the training ways, the medical treatment and coaching they receive, and even the travel ways to matches.

The players involved includes prominent stars like Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe and Carli Lloyd as well as their teammates who are some of the most accomplished and best-known female players in the world, members of a squad that has been a leading force in female sports for more than a generation.

The  continuing battle between women’s soccer players and U.S. Soccer, which is not only their employer, but also the federation that governs the sport in America, has pushed them to the forefront of an expanding fight for equality in women’s sports. In recent years, the  athletes in other sports genres such as American hockey gold medalists, Canadian soccer pros, W.N.B.A. players — have communicated to the United States players and their union for instruction in their efforts to win similar gains in terms of paychecks and working conditions.

For many years, U.S. Soccer Federation has been a world leader in its support for women’s soccer; its contribution of time and resources which has brought the United States became a three-time world champion and a four-time Olympic gold medalist, the major power in women’s game. But at that time generations of women’s national team players are always complaining that the federation’s financial support and logistical infrastructure for women’s athletes have lagged behind in comparison with the more high-profile men’s team.

The fight of women’s players maximize their value in the same way other athletes have done and provide a roadmap for the next team home or abroad which catches fire and has to follow suits related to the great inequities in resources or a governing body’s discrimination between the men’s soccer and the women’s.